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Hi.

follow along on my misadventures in fashion, cooking, writing and adulthood as I rapidly approach 30. 

The Disease of Wellness

The Disease of Wellness

Wellness is everywhere. Your friends are talking about it. Your co-workers are talking about it. Bloggers are talking about it. Celebrities are talking about it. It's exhaustive and exhausting. The ultimate irony. 

But what does it actually mean? For me, wellness is a slippery slope, as I think it has different meaning for everyone, as it should. And yet...we can't get enough, constantly trying to define this always-changing, industry. Because that's really what is: an industry.  

Wellness, according to Dictionary.com, is "the quality or state of being healthy in body and mind, especially as the result of deliberate effort." Hm...can you vague that up for us?

And let us not forget there are different types of wellness: emotional wellness. physical wellness. intellectual wellness. spiritual wellness. Wellness is a garden, with each  type acting as its own plant, needing constant care and attention in order to blossom.

But tending to that garden is really freakin' tiring sometimes, especially when your thumb never seems to be green enough to keep out the weeds. It can be draining constantly trying to keep up, whether with the pressure we put on ourselves to be our "best self" or the latest trend in "self-care." And it's all too easy to fall into the trap of feeling like there's always something more you can and should be doing. Is it bad to strive to just be well-enough? And why do we feel guilty when we feel content? 

I admit, I'm constantly reading about the daily routines of others, bookmarking the restaurants they try, studios they exercise at and the products they swear by. (However, #sponcon has made that last one a bit tricky as of late. Example: you are out of your GD mind if you consider paying $24 for a jar of coconut yogurt. Cult, indeed.) I confess: I'm not above screen-shotting or swiping up on an Instagram story featuring a product by a wellness blogger I follow or peeking in a particularly well-dressed woman's shopping cart at Whole Foods to see what she's buying.

(Prime example of the wellness contagion: I was recently hiking with two friends and one revealed she started dry-brushing after reading about it, and as soon as I got home, I started Googling, just looking for yet another way to improve, to be better, to brush my way to ultimate self-care. {Oh, self-care: A topic for another time, friends.})

But why-oh-why do we think using the same product as a seemingly healthy, happy and having-it-all person will somehow have their effect rub off on us? Deep down, I know eating the same brand of hummus as a 5'10" Amazonian beauty isn't going to make me magically sprout 9 inches, or improve my life in any real way. Yet, that is the alluring myth of the wellness industry: Do this and you will be happy! Eat this and you will love your body! 

Sadly, it doesn't work that way. And that's OK. I think wellness, really, is that realization that it's OK to not have it all figured out, that what you are currently doing (or not doing) is enough. Wellness is an ongoing journey, one that you have to find your own path on, and it's all too easy to just follow one already formed by someone else. 

Merry Everything (Alt. Title: How I Came to Love Christmas More Than Anyone You've Ever Met)

Merry Everything (Alt. Title: How I Came to Love Christmas More Than Anyone You've Ever Met)

Adulthood {Vol. 1}

Adulthood {Vol. 1}